Notes


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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 According to notes compiled by Blythe V. V. Poage Kaiser, in 1966:

" The William F. (Emma) Kaiser family lived on a farm north of Sutherland most of their lives. Moved to Sutherland to retire. Son, Charley Kaiser, still has the old home farm in 1966." 
Family F108
 
2 According to notes compiled by Blythe V. V. Poage Kaiser, in 1966:

"The Christof Kaiser family came from Lippe-Detmold, Germany in the year 1855. They came to Galena, Illinois probably up the Mississippi River from New Orleans as their point of entry.

Lippe-Detmold is in Germany, north and west of center about 50 miles from the Belgian line. Now simply called Lippe with a good sized town in it called Detmold. This is a rather lower and smoother section of Germany."

According to the "Kaiser Chronicles, 1982" : Arrival to the U.S.A. is May, 1856. In Feb. 1856, as required by law, they filed an 'Intent to Emigrate,' which ws published in the local newspaper. In March, 1857, record of the baprism of their son, August (born Dec. 1856) at St. John's Church, Freeport, IL. Two of Christoph Kaiser's younger brothers had already settled in the early 1850's in Freeport, IL.

The 1860 Census lists both Christoph Kaiser and his brother, Fred, as teamsters, living in Freeport's Third Ward. About 1864, Christoph purchased farmland south of Freeport in Florence Township, Stephenson County, Illinois. The family prospered on the new farm. The 1870 Agricultural Census credits Christoph Kaiser with 230 acres of land, 12 horses, 10 milch cows, 14 sheep, 17 swine, and 20 "other cattle." They raised wheat, corn, oats, barely, hay, and potatoes. 
Kaiser, Friedrich Christoph (I0355)
 
3 According to notes compiled by Blythe V. V. Poage Kaiser, in 1966:

"The Christof Kaiser family came from Lippe-Detmold, Germany in the year 1855. They came to Galena, Illinois probably up the Mississippi River from New Orleans as their point of entry.

Lippe-Detmold is in Germany, north and west of center about 50 miles from the Belgian line. Now simply called Lippe with a good sized town in it called Detmold. This is a rather lower and smoother section of Germany."

According to the "Kaiser Chronicles, 1982" : Arrival to the U.S.A. is May, 1856. In Feb. 1856, as required by law, they filed an 'Intent to Emigrate,' which ws published in the local newspaper. In March, 1857, record of the baprism of their son, August (born Dec. 1856) at St. John's Church, Freeport, IL. Two of Christoph Kaiser's younger brothers had already settled in the early 1850's in Freeport, IL.

The 1860 Census lists both Christoph Kaiser and his brother, Fred, as teamsters, living in Freeport's Third Ward. About 1864, Christoph purchased farmland south of Freeport in Florence Township, Stephenson County, Illinois. The family prospered on the new farm. The 1870 Agricultural Census credits Christoph Kaiser with 230 acres of land, 12 horses, 10 milch cows, 14 sheep, 17 swine, and 20 "other cattle." They raised wheat, corn, oats, barely, hay, and potatoes. 
Hoefer, Catherina Sophia (I0356)
 
4 According to notes compiled by Blythe V. V. Poage Kaiser, in 1966:

"The Christof Kaiser family came from Lippe-Detmold, Germany in the year 1855. They came to Galena, Illinois probably up the Mississippi River from New Orleans as their point of entry.

Lippe-Detmold is in Germany, north and west of center about 50 miles from the Belgian line. Now simply called Lippe with a good sized town in it called Detmold. This is a rather lower and smoother section of Germany."

According to the "Kaiser Chronicles, 1982" : Arrival to the U.S.A. is May, 1856. In Feb. 1856, as required by law, they filed an 'Intent to Emigrate,' which ws published in the local newspaper. In March, 1857, record of the baprism of their son, August (born Dec. 1856) at St. John's Church, Freeport, IL. Two of Christoph Kaiser's younger brothers had already settled in the early 1850's in Freeport, IL.

The 1860 Census lists both Christoph Kaiser and his brother, Fred, as teamsters, living in Freeport's Third Ward. About 1864, Christoph purchased farmland south of Freeport in Florence Township, Stephenson County, Illinois. The family prospered on the new farm. The 1870 Agricultural Census credits Christoph Kaiser with 230 acres of land, 12 horses, 10 milch cows, 14 sheep, 17 swine, and 20 "other cattle." They raised wheat, corn, oats, barely, hay, and potatoes. 
Family F132
 
5 According to notes compiled by Blythe V. V. Poage Kaiser, in 1966:

"The Schauer family came first to Philadelphia (from Nertingen, Vestenberg (Wurtemburg) Germany) and then lived for a number of years in Reading, Pennsylvania where several of their children were born. Their entry into the United States of America was dated May 11, 1848.

Their final residence was Freeport, Illinois.

Wurtemberg section of Germany is in the south western part near Switzerland." 
Family F126
 
6 All Poage lineage/geneaology was compiled by Blythe and possibly her mother, Catherine Tipton Poage. Both were members of the Daughters of the American Revolution and Daughters of American Colonists. Blythe was a member of Anan Harmon Chapter of the DAR and Dupage Chapter of DAC, she served both as regent.

Organizing president of the Glen Ellyn Historical Society.

Active in many community organizations, including Glen Ellyn Woman's Club, Musician's Club, Republican Woman's Club, alumni clubs of Iowa State and Drake Universities.

Blythe was a charter member of the Glen Ellyn Garden Club, serving as a master flowershow judge.

Blythe's burial services were conducted on August 22, 1988 at The Leonard Memorial Home, Ltd. of Glen Ellyn, Illinois. Rev. Donald C. Keck officiated. Burial took place at Forest Hill Cemetery in Glen Ellyn, Illinois.

According to her niece, Daisy Kaiser Sampson, on June 24, 2000:
"We knew she was a society lady, and she did her best to fit in with us old dirt farmers -- she did a good job at it. She always dressed in high heel pumps, wore lots of jewelry up to the nines, but yet tried to fit down at our level!! We enjoyed her, even if she was a society lady." 
Poage, Blythe Viola Victoria (I0063)
 
7 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F055
 
8 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Kaiser, Caryl Jean (I0060)
 
9 Customer pedigree. Source (S03968)
 
10 Daniel had a successful kidney transplant in 1996. Daniel worked at Hennepin County Hospital in various departments; transportation, teletech, department secretary, transcriber, reception. Daniel played the accordian. Heine, Daniel Charles (I1037)
 
11 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Daniels, Doris Belle (I0058)
 
12 George Gilliland Poage was a Congregational Minister. For years he was pastor in Ross County, Ohio and LaSalle County, Illinois (1855-1857). He organized several new churches in Iowa. He was paster of Wittemburg Church, Newton, Iowa, during the Civil War. Poage, Reverend George Gilliland (I0076)
 
13 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F056
 
14 Indian Missionary, St. Peter, Minnesota Pond, Reverend Gideon (I0310)
 
15 Information supplied by Doris Belle Daniels Kaiser, "George Formanek was a United States Naval Flier aboard an aircraft carrier. His plane was shot down when on a mission over Hollandia and never found." Formanek, George (I0208)
 
16 It is unknown why the children had the last name of their mother "Hoefer" and not "Willer." Their were engaged in farming at House #32 in teh village of Langenholzhausen, principality of Lippe, Germany. Friedrich Christian Willer was a shoemaker as well as a farmer. His wife, Sophia CAtherina Hoefer was heiress to the farmstead and house #84. Family F290
 
17 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Poage, Margaret Kathryn (I0083)
 
18 May have possibly been born in or around Dauphin, Manitoba, Canada. Never confirmed birthplace. Came to United States around 16 years of age. Was not born in Poland, contrary to obituary print and wife, Helena's claim. Komarnicki, John (I0003)
 
19 Never married Cox, Donald Worth (I0477)
 
20 Never married. Left mult-million dollar estate to relatives. Kaiser, Charley Henry (I0324)
 
21 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Habeck, James Hollis (I0332)
 
22 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F069
 
23 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F179
 
24 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F180
 
25 Physician at Ripley, Ohio, and Indian Missionary, St. Peter, Minnesota Williamson, Doctor Thos Smith (I0308)
 
26 Robert Poage Kaiser attended Glen Ellyn, Illinois schools, graduating from Glenbard West High School in 1935. He earned an architectural degree from the University of Illinois in 1941.

Information supplied by Doris Belle Daniels Kaiser, his wife, " Served in the U. S. Navy from 1941 to about 1945 or 1946. Two years spent in the Joint Intelligence Center Pacific Ocean Area - Headquarters Hawaii and Photo Interpretation."

The following are notes compiled by Blythe V.V. Poage Kaiser in 1966:
"Robert was a Lieutenant in World War II in the Naval Air intelligence. Graduate of University of Illinois with a degree in Architecture. Nov. (1966) living in Lake Bluff, Illinois and is Vice President and General Manager of the American Concrete Corporation. Doris Daniels' father and mother are Arthur and Florence Daniels of Chicago and now of Pompano Beach, Florida. Doris is a graduate of University of Chicago. Kenneth P. Kaiser received his degree from Iowa State University in 1965 but is continuing in the school of Architecture."

Robert was employed by the American Concrete Corp., Waukegan, Illinois. He eventually became Vice President and General Manager. After his retirement, he served as a building commissioner for the Village of Lake Bluff.

Robert's graveside services were conducted May 18, 1990 at Forest Hill Cemetery in Glen Ellyn, Illinois. Memorial Services were conducted later that day at the Methodist Church in Lake Bluff, with the Rev. Orrell Ruth officiating. 
Kaiser, Robert Poage (I0057)
 
27 Submitted from Daisy Blythe Kaiser (07/01/2000):

We had lots of company every Sunday it seemed(Mom was a good, generous cook who believed in the best for company).

Dad was the township assessor and I got to ride along. I remember him telling me how people would move their livestock and machinery to another place if they knew he was coming!!

We would drive to Minnesota to see the farm and the renter and I could sense that he was pretty unhappy with the renter there. I never dreamt that that would soon be my new home.

Decoration Day was strictly a holiday and we would dress up with our very best clothes and go to the cemetery in Sutherland and decorate Dean's grave plus some others. THere would be a big parade there, and a regular service too.

It seemed like Dad always had lots of welding to do with his machinery, so that meant a ride along over to see his cousin in Gaza, Harry Kaiser. (I rode along everywhere be cause I wasn't in school yet). Dad did so some of that himself at home.

We always had a playhouse out in the grove, and spent lots of time there.

In the summer of 1929, a new school house for our township was being built close to home--about one fourth mile north of us. We would walk up there and watch them build it, it would have an inside toilet.

One morning when Mother went to the mailbox to mail a letter, she sound the nicest little police puppy, waiting for a home. WE adopted him instantly, and he became a faithful member of our family.

In September school started and I was in the first grade, no kindergarten then. Little did I know then that I would not get to enjoy that nice building very long.

Soon the stock market would crash and that would mean the loss of 2 farms. It was then that the folks decided to move to the farm in Minnesota, and Dad was very unhappy with the renter.

It would be one day in November that Dad would write a letter to Grandpa Kaiser that read:

Dear Sir:
I am moving to Minnesota March 1, 1930.
Yours truly,
Levi G. Kaiser
Business was business with Grandpa and Grandma, right down to the penny. I don't remember of being aware that we were about to move.

I would be missing Charlie very much, we grew very close, and I followed him all around the farm and helped(?) him do everything including grease the machinery. He would put me up on the horses to ride all around the farm. He had so much patience.

Dad was gone quite a lot doing custom work--corn shelling the year round and threshing in the summertime.

All the while during the fall of 1929 Dad was busy taking machinery to the farm in Minnesota. That meant pulling the threshing machine and corn sheller to Minnesota with the Hart Parr--a large heavy duty tractor. It was slow, and probably went about 5 miles per at the fastest. so that meant a long trip. He would stay with his friends, the Maranells who lived north of Hartley, Iowa.

He and Charlie would split up the other machinery, but the most sad part was splitting up that beautiful team of Belgian horses!! They were red with black manes and tails!! Charlie kept Barney, and Dad took Queen.

My Grandpa Parrish had a truck, so he helped with all the moving. It was Grandpa Parrish who got my Sister and I from school to make the long trip up to our new home.

Goodbye Iowa, Minnesota, here we come!!!!

The scraggly pines that stood in front of the bedroom window made the most lonesome sound as the wind blew through them that first night in Minnesota.

It was cold that morning and it was time to go to school. Dad started Grandpa's truck with the tractor. What a disappointment it was to see the schoolhouse, after leaving that new one in Iowa. It was so old and cold that I knew it must have been one the settlers had gone to!

It was spring very soon, and the one and one half mile walk to school was a pleasant one;wild flowers grew on both sides in the ditch, and pheasants, meadowlarks,wrens, brown thrashers and other birds nesting would be disturbed by our footsteps.

Spring came early that year so the oats were planted early. Corn would be planted in May as soon as the frost was out of the ground. Already there was a large pasture and alfalfa field. There were many rocks in the field that were left by the glacier, and would have to be picked up before the corn was planted. The field on the south edge of the farm was an extra rich black soil that had sea shells in it that were left from the glacier. That would make a fine potato field.

We didn't have much livestock at first, but in time the herd grew. We started with five shorthorns- Dad raised them for the calves-they weren't much for milking. In time the herd grew to fifteen, and we fed hogs and steers.

Ducks and geese were added to the poultry flock, but we soon stopped raising them after we had enough for feathers. Sheep were added to the mix-we sold the wool and lambs.

We sold eggs to the Boote Hatchery in Worthington. Hatching eggs require extra care such as cleaning them with vinegar, sorting them, and must be kept cool.

We had two incubators in which we hatched our own chicks. They were set up in the living room and heated with a kerosene lamp, each having a thermometer in to keep the temperature at a correct point. Eggs were put in trays, taken out twice a day, morning and evening, and rolled very gently taking the place of the mother hen. This was done quickly so as to not let the eggs cool off. There would be little chicks in three weeks. It was such fun to watch the little chicks pecking their way out of the shell. Their next home would be a nice warm, clean brooder house with a kerosene stove in, and clean straw on the floor.

We needed a windbreak on the south side of the yard, so Chinese elms were planted for their fast growth. Mulberry trees were planted for the birds, hoping they would leave the other fruit alone.

There was some time for leisure!! After a rain we would go out in the grove and dig up earthworms for bait to go fishing. We had homemade fishing poles that Dad had made. We could pull the fish in so fast that Dad hardly had time to bait the hooks. We lived in a fisherman's paradise!! We lived close to so many lakes--to name a few there was Round Lake, Iowa Lake, Silver Lake, Heron Lake, Lake Ocheda, Lake Okabena and more. We met my future brother-in-law at a little creek where I caught my first fish. He was sitting there with his ever-pleasant smiling face and offered us minnows

Our mailing address was always confusing-we lived in Minnesota but the address was Lake Park, Iowa. It was almost the middle of June now and in the mail was a letter from Grandma Kaiser saying that she had had a letter from Uncle Bill saying that they were coming, and were coming up to see us!!

Of course Aunt Blythe, and Aunt Myrtle would come too--maybe Uncle Charlie, depending on his chores. We were very anxious to see them as this had been the longest time that we hadn't seen any relation from Sutherland(or Chicago). While down at Sutherland, we had company most every Sunday. Uncle Bill would be driving his usual black Oldsmobile(and wiping it off with a soft cloth) as soon as he got there!!

That meant we had better get everything in apple pie order!! Grandma was the first Martha Stewart-everything was neat, clean, and in it's place.

DID YOU KNOW?? 1. Grandma had three mischief makers. They were Bill, Lillie and Levi. They decided to take their clothes and run away to make their fortune. However, the plan soon ran amok, as Grandpa soon overtook them north of the farm up by the Ortmann farm.

2. The Wonder Bread man who stopped in at the store won Myrtle's heart over and married her.

3. Bill always drove a shiny new Oldsmobile to Grandma's in the summer time. After each drive, each speck of dirt was dusted off.

4. Levi stood on a stool when he was four years old and washed baby diapers.

5. Levi walked every morning to High School in Sutherland(5 miles), but had to quit in January because there were so many chores to do.

5. Charlie owned two farms, 160 acres each.

6. Charlie had a housekeeper who was trying to win him over
 
Kaiser, Levi Gottlieb (I0315)
 
28 The following are notes written by Blythe V.V. Poage Kaiser in 1966:

"William and Blythe lived for a short time in Ames, Iowa where William was on the Agricultural Engineering Faculty. They went to Chicago, Illinois in January, 1917 and spent the next few years in the city but moved to the suburb of Glen Ellyn in March, 1920 where they have lived ever since. William was an executive of the Portland Cement Association and a consulting Agricultural Engineer. Blythe is a member of several Patriotic Societies: DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) and DAC (Daughters of American Colonists) and is also a Master Judge of Flower Shows accredited through the National Council of State Garden Clubs. Both William and Blythe have degrees from the Iowa State University - Ames." 
Family F027
 
29 The following is an obituary taken from the Sutherland Courier, Iowa, June, 1963:

WILLIAM G. KAISER
1887-1963

William George Kaiser was born June 10, 1887, on a farm near Freeport, Stephenson County, Illinois, and died suddenly May 28, 1963 at his home 468 Hill Avenue, Glen Ellyn, Illinois of a coronary. Before he was a year old the family moved to O'Brien County, where he attended rural district school and the Sutherland high school. His parents were Mr. & Mrs. William F. Kaiser.

He was active in debate and sports in high school, and at Iowa State College, he won varsity letters for track in his junior and senior years. He graduated from Iowa State College, Ames, in 1914, and was valedictorian of his class. He took his bachelor's degree in Agricultural Engineering, followed by the professional degree in 1919.

He was married to Blythe Poage on November 11, 1915. They have one son, Robert P. Kaiser, who is vice president of the American Concrete Corporation, Waukegan, Illinois. Robert and his wife, Doris, who live at Lake Bluff, Illinois, have four children, Kenneth, Allan, Caryl Jean, and Donald.

In 1917 he became associated with the Portland Cement Association, and the same year became a member of the A.S.A.E. Since then the agricultural engineering of the company has been pretty much the same as the career of Mr. Kaiser. He organized a farm building plan, prepared illustrated articles for the farm press and among other activities supervised the over-all strategy of the industry's farm extension program.

From 1933 to 1945, Mr. Kaiser had charge of the Association's work for the extension of concrete dwelling house construction, was manager of Cement Producer Bureau in P.C.A. and he served as chairman of a committee on concrete building units in the American Society for Testing Materials.

In 1935 he became a member of the American Concrete Institute, and among his duties was service on the committee which developed recommended practices for the construction of farm silos. He served as president of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, as well as holding other positions.

He was officially retired from Portland Cement Association in 1952, but continued to work there as a consulting engineer for five years. One of his assignments during this time was an extensive concrete housing survey in Florida. Because of his work on a similar committee in the American Society of Agricultural Engineers he served for about 10 years on the Farm Equipment and Structure Research Advisory Committee of the United States Department of Agriculture.

In 1946 he was awarded the Cyrus Hall McCormick medal presented for his consistent career of worthy work in the engineering of agriculture.

Besides his wife, son, and grandchildren, Mr. Kaiser is survived by four sisters, Mrs. Emma Hill and Mrs. Agnes Duncan of Sutherland, Iowa, Mrs. Lillian Bundy of Hacienda Heights, California, and Mrs. Myrtle Miller of Sunland, California; and three brothers, Levi of Lake Park, Walter of Blencoe, and Charley of Sutherland, Iowa. 
Kaiser, Professor William George (I0062)
 
30 The following is related by Daisy Kaiser Sampson on June 21, 2000:

Ray Bundy was gassed during World War I and died in 1928. They lived in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Lillian worked in the Morrell Packing Plant there for many years until moving to California, about 1944, give or take a few years. She took care of foster children there, and she lived close to Marjorie, her daughter, and her daughter (Marjorie's) Roberta.  
Family F118
 
31 The following is related by Daisy Kaiser Sampson, June 21, 2000:

Myrtle graduated from the high school in Sutherland (Iowa), and lived with Grandma (Emma Schauer Kaiser) until late in life. She and Ruth Camery bought a general store there (Sutherland, Iowa)--very nice one--sold groceries and dry goods, named 'Camery & Kaiser.' She met a fellow there named Royce Miller (the Wonder Bread delivery man), got married, sold the store, and moved to California. Royce died, and she met an evangelist, Rev. Leslie who took her to Tennessee. Although Myrtle did not marry him, she left her money to him. Lillian Kaiser Cooper Bundy, her sister, sued Rev. Leslie and got the proceeds from Myrtle's house, Rev. Leslie got the rest. 
Kaiser, Myrtle Luella (I0327)
 
32 The following is related by the daughter of Levi Kaiser, Daisy Kaiser Sampson, on June 21, 2000:

Levi sold land in Louisana and Minnesota for Payne Investment Co. of Omaha (before he was married). He did custom corn shelling and threshing, before and after marriage. He also played the violin and accordian for square dances in their home (he played by ear).

It is possible that he co-owned a farm in Brookings, South Dakota, with his brother, William G. Kaiser. During the depression, that was the first farm he had to give up, then gave the second one up close to the one we still own right across the Minnesota state line, where Bill and Blythe would come to visit us, and they enjoyed it so much!!!


 
Kaiser, Levi Gottlieb (I0315)
 
33 The following notes were compiled by Blythe V.V. Poage Kaiser in 1966:

(Copy) "This is to certify that Robert Arthur Poage and Catherine Ohio Tipton were united in marriage at the family residence near Baxter on the first day of January in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and ninety one in the presence of Robert Alexander Scott, Alonzo Scott Tiption.
Signed Rev. Wesley Brandt" 
Family F041
 
34 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F191
 
35 The following was related by Mr. Robert D. Kracke, son of Rose Daniels & Leo Kracke, on July 24, 2000, regarding the work of Isaac Daniels:

Isaac Daniels was an itinerant butcher for years, working in neighborhood shops. Refrigeration was by ice only then, so there was a butcher shop located in every block. (Housewives bought meat on a daily basis). Then he worked for, or in, the Brennan Packaging Co. in Chicago. He processed the animals that required special handling after being shipped in from all over the mid-west. He supplied local small institutions, not many street customers. He did poultry, too.



The following was related by Mr. Robert D. Kracke, son of Rose Daniels & Leo Kracke, on July 24, 2000, regarding the death of Isaac Daniels:

It was traditional for my Aunt Sadie and her sister (my mother Rose) to celebrate their birthdays with a kaffee klatsch at our house, both birthdays only two days apart. On July 23, 1934, I was home because my summer job at Swift & Co. was working only three days per week. My father was home because work was slow for him also. Chicago was in the middle of the worst heat spell in its history. Grandma Daniels (Dorothea) and all the ladies had klatsched and were on their way home. Aunt Sadie and Anna Fastnow took Grandma Daniels to her home. Soon after leaving, we had a 'phone call from Anna. "Pa hung himself." My Dad and I popped in our four cyclinder Chevy and raced down to Grandma's. We saw an M.D. working on Grandpa Daniels (Isaac), who was lying on his bed. The two ladies had cut the cord that was tied to the upper hinge of his bedroom's door, and with the M.D. had gotten him on his bed (he was short but weighed over 200 lbs.) The scrub bucket that he had stood on to tighten the noose was still there. Dad and I left soon thereafter to take care of my mother at our place two miles away. Isaac had been suffering from the heat and knew that his health was failing. He didn't want to be in anyone's way. He could see no other way out, apparently. Soon thereafter, my parents and I moved in with Grandma Daniels and lived there until I married and I moved out. My folks lived there for a short while until they doubled up with Bill and Sadie Gallagher. Grandma Daniels went to live with Marie Daniels and her son, Ed. 
Daniels, Isaac (I0216)
 
36 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #2696, Date of Import: Mar 2, 2000]

John Poage, eldest son of Robert Poage and Elizabeth Preston, was assistant surveyor in Augusta County, Va. 1760, vestryman Augusta Parish 1763, high sheriff and county surveyor 1778, and farmer.  
Poage, John (I0449)
 
37 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #2696, Date of Import: Mar 2, 2000]

On May 22, 1740 sixteen heads of families appreared at Orange Country Court and proved their importation at their own expense and right to obtain lands from the King's bounty; among them Alexander Brakenridge with seven children and Robert Poage with his wife Elizabeth Preston and their nine children, (Thomas Poage was born in Virginia) from Ireland.  
Poage, Robert (I0451)
 
38 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 2, Ed. 1, Tree #2696, Date of Import: Mar 2, 2000]

P. 138 & P.404 
Poage, James (I0287)
 


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